Curbside Service has Become the New Normal

Social distancing has changed our food-centric state in ways we never imagined. Curbside service has become the new normal for many eateries. Others are relying heavily upon delivery services. Still others are altering their business models in more significant ways. 

While lives depend upon safe interactions, livelihoods depend upon businesses remaining in business. I wrote a story for Alabama NewsCenter about some of the ways food- and drink-related establishments are addressing the coronavirus crisis.

You can read the entire story here.

Meanwhile, here are some things you should know:

The dining rooms at all four Ashley Mac’s stores are closed, but Ashley McMakin, who owns the company with her husband, Andy, is still making homestyle casseroles and salads and desserts for pick-up and limited delivery. 

You can still get cupcakes at Ashley Mac’s.

And now, the Ashley Mac’s team is offering something else, too. 

“We were just trying to think of some things we could do for the community,” McMakin says, “and one thing we can get—that a lot of people cannot get at the grocery store—is produce.” So, they are packing boxes full of fresh fruits and vegetables. For $30, you can get a box of produce ranging from romaine, onions, broccoli and tomatoes to strawberries, cantaloupe and pineapple. McMakin says they will offer the produce boxes, which will vary according to what’s available and fresh, as long as there’s a demand and they can get enough produce in. 

Be sure to check Ashley Mac’s social media outlets for availability of items and produce boxes. Call 205-822-4142 for free pickup or 205-968-4126 for delivery with a $100 order.

Panache, Domestique Coffee’s charming little coffeeshop down an alley off 20th Street in Five Points South, is closed for now. So is Domestique Coffee Café inside Saturn in Avondale, but the Birmingham-based, small-batch coffee importer and roaster that specializes in single-origin coffeebeans is banking on a brighter future. 

Get Domestique coffee sent straight to your home.

Domestique is a multifaceted business that buys coffee from specialty growers all over the world including Haiti, Ethiopia, Bolivia, Mexico and elsewhere, so it’s not just local employees who are counting on this company.

So, CEO Nathan Pocus, who co-founded Domestique with his brother, Michael, says the company is inviting its customers to become co-founders, too. 

They are offering a Founder’s Card for $100. Sales of the cards will help the business now and allow buyers to enjoy lots of benefits later including a free batch brew for a month upon Domestique’s reopening, (a $90 value alone), 10% off all purchases for life, free digital products for life, early access notifications for all special events, monthly discount codes to use on the company’s online platform,  a ticket to the fun Founder’s Day party and more.  Go to www.domestique.com to learn more.

Big Spoon Creamery, the Birmingham-based small-batch, artisanal ice cream maker, has closed both its stores for now. But their handmade frozen treats (pint packs and sammie packs) are available for 24-hour delivery in the Birmingham area. 

This small-batch ice cream is like nothing else!

Ryan O’Hara, who owns Big Spoon along with his wife, Geri-Martha, says everything is done online, and “it’s a great way for us to try to keep going and a great way to promote social distancing. People don’t have to leave their homes.” 

So every day, they deliver as much ice cream as they can. “We didn’t think there would be such a huge response,” O’Hara says. “We’ve only been doing it for three days now, but we’ve had to cut off deliveries for the day when we reach our capacity. … We’re going round the clock. Desperate times call for desperate measures. We’re trying to do what we can to stay afloat.”

This home delivery allows Ryan and Geri-Martha to keep employing most of their full-time staff. Many of the part-time employees were college students who have since gone home. “We are prioritizing taking care of our people who rely on this job to support themselves,” he says.

To place your order visit https://www.bigspooncreamery.com/shop.

Little Savannah Restaurant & Bar is a fine-dining establishment, although Chef Clif Holt likes to say when you’re there, you’re simply “dining fine.” His customers are still dining in fine style, but they’re doing it at home with takeaway dinners for two and four. And Chef Holt has figured out another way to help his historic Forest Park neighborhood where he has operated his restaurant for 16 years:  He’s opening a neighborhood grocery. 

The grocery will stock raw protein by the pound (ground beef, ribeyes, chicken and fresh Gulf shrimp and snapper); dairy and French baguettes; fresh produce (oranges, onions, tomatoes, potatoes, bananas and apples); and even toilet paper(!), paper towels, bottled water and boxes of latex gloves. 

All the necessities for right now. All at fair market prices.

“We’re not going to get rich off it,” he says of the grocery. “But it’s a service we can provide at a reasonable cost and keep our flow going.” 

That flow involves his employees, whom he’s trying to keep at work, and fish purveyors and truck drivers and even the folks who pick up the garbage.  “People don’t think about that,” he says. “We have a shortage of thought sometimes about how these things are going to go. For me, the main thing I’m trying to figure out is how we can retain as much normalcy as possible.” 

Normalcy currently means dinners for two or family dinners for four with the kinds of foods Holt’s customers have come to expect from Little Savannah. Things like hand-rolled pasta Bolognese or beef Bourguignon with herbed rice, Caesar salads and homemade focaccia. 

You can check Facebook for the daily meal specials and follow Little Savannah on Instagram for more info. Orders must be placed by 4 p.m. for pick-up or delivery the next day. Curbside pick-up hours are 4-6 p.m., and there is a $5 delivery fee. Call or text 205-616-0995 or go to info@littlesavannah.com to place your order.

Kay Bruno Reed, owner of Everything IZ, which includes IZ Weddings & Events and IZ Café, is one of the state’s busiest caterers, easily handling parties for hundreds and even thousands. On a smaller, more local level, she has been part of the Rocky Ridge neighborhood of Vestavia Hills for more than 20 years. Now, with weddings and large events canceled, she’s working to feed her neighbors—one family at a time. 

IZ cafe has been serving since 1999; they are not stopping now. Photo from Everything IZ.

She says, “Our staff has been working nonstop to keep our freezer stocked for our customers. We have been offering curbside pick-up for years but are now offering free delivery.” 

She’s also stocking basic staple items like milk, bread and eggs. Reed says the response has been amazing. “Customers are thanking us for being open and feeding them.”

All of the company’s full-time employees who want to be there, continue to work there. Those who have chosen to self-quarantine, she says, are taking a portion of their paid time off. 

Reed is approaching her work amid the COVID-19 pandemic in a positive way. 

“My hope, first of all, is that it is over soon and with very few deaths.” She also says she hopes “parents will take this time to teach their children basic domestic skills while they are studying at home. 

“My prayer is that this will bring our nation together for the good of all.”

Go to everythingiz.com to see what’s available and to order.

Virtual Storytime

Bedtime. Is there anything sweeter when your children are little? Brush teeth, storytime, one song, prayers and a goodnight kiss. 

Bedtime. Is there anything harder when your children are little and you’re just flat worn out? And they want “just one more” story, song, kiss.

I must have read this one a million times. Love it!

Why not now (when everything has changed) change up that routine, too? Here are some free! virtual storytime links for your kiddos and you. I found these links on Pure Wow, which I love. Thank you to Alexandra Hough for putting them together and sharing.

Storyline Online streams videos of celebrities reading children’s books alongside cool illustrations. Previous readers include Viola Davis, Chris Pine, Lily Tomlin, Kevin Costner, Annette Bening, James Earl Jones, Betty White and more.

Want to be the bedtime hero? Have Olaf (Josh Gad) from Frozen read to your kids tonight. The 39-year-old actor is helping out during these trying times by reading his favorite children’s books on social media.

Another favorite at our house.

Your options for virtual storytime are many and varied if you search the #OperationStoryTime tag on social media. You’ll find a growing (by that, I mean every few hours!) collection of children’s book authors, celebrities and illustrators reading books (their own works and others) aloud for children and families.

Oliver Jeffers will read his books and tell you how he wrote them.

The artist, illustrator and writer Oliver Jeffers will read from one of his books every weekday (and talk about what went into making it) on Instagram Live beginning at 1 p.m. CST. These #stayathomestorytime episodes will be on his Insta story for 24 hours and on his site after that. As he says, “We are all at home, but none of us are alone. Let’s be bored together.”

Actors Jennifer Garner and Amy Adams launched the “Save With Stories” initiative in partnership Save the Children and No Kid Hungry. The idea here is to post storytime videos on Facebook and Instagram and raise money for children stuck at home right now.

The Brooklyn Public Library is closed, of course, but the folks there are still committed to children’s programming. You’ll find book readings, songs and more on Facebook Live and its website. View the broadcast on the Brooklyn Public Library Family page at 10:00 am. CST or catch past episodes on the Facebook page.

Drive-Thru Farmers Market at Pepper Place

The Market at Pepper Place has, for decades, promoted a “know thy farmer” way of doing business full of meaningful human interaction and conversations that make buying fresh produce and enjoyable and entertaining.

from the Market at Pepper Place

In light of the COVID-19 crisis, the market is taking a different approach these days with a Drive-Thru Farmers Market and a pre-ordering system that still gives you access to locally grown veggie boxes, farm eggs, baked goods, meats and more.

The second week of the Drive Through Farmers Market, will happen on Saturday, March 28 from 7 a.m. to noon in the “big parking lot” on 2nd Avenue South.

In response to health and safety restrictions related to COVID-19, this “contactless” market will allow farmers to continue selling the freshest locally grown produce available in the state directly to customers, and minimize the elements of traditional farmers market transactions that have been deemed high-risk in the current climate.

Here’s how this Drive-Thru Farmers Market at Pepper Place works.

• Click on this link to find out which vendors are participating each week. Vendor listings and links are updated on Monday.

• Each participating vendor’s name will be noted with their offerings, how to order, the order deadline and how they will accept payment.

• Place your orders, pre-pay online, and you’re done until Market day.

• Saturday, 7am-Noon, come to the Pepper Place Drive-Thru Farmers Market in the Pepper Place parking lot on 2nd Ave. South.

• Please remain in your car at all times. The farmer will load the back of your vehicle with pre-purchased goods using gloves and social distancing!

from the Market at Pepper Place

Please note that there will be no walk-ups or onsite purchases. Market staff and a security guard will be onsite to assist and answer any questions. The farmers, staff and customers are expected to follow all recommended safety precautions, including social distancing and hand washing. If you are sick or feel unwell, please send someone else to pick up your orders.

from the Market at Pepper Place

The folks at the Market at Pepper Place say they hope this drive-thru market will be successful for their farmers and shoppers while complying with the latest safety recommendations of the CDC and our State and County health officials.

With everyone working together and supporting each other—and supporting our farmers and local businesses—we will get through this time stronger and better than ever.

Again click here for this Saturday’s vendor list and links to their order pages.

from the Market at Pepper Place

Since 2000, Pepper Place Market has offered a special space for local and regional farmers and many makers to sell each Saturday. We’ll be back to that again. Meanwhile, I hope you’ll continue to support them all.

Give Blood

While most of us are being advised to stay home, my deepest appreciation goes out to those who are essential to our society–the first responders, doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, pharmacists, gas station attendants, restaurant workers (who still are able to work) and so many more who are out there keeping things working and moving forward right now.

Thank you. Thank you all so much.

Now I’m going to ask some of you who are home to leave your homes today and go one place: Go give blood. If you can, briefly go out into this world and give blood. Then pick up some curbside takeout from a local restaurant. That’s all.

There is a huge need right now for both those things, and since it’s important that you eat well after giving blood, that takes care of that.

You can go to Red Cross Blood to find the nearest blood drive. Just put in your zip code. You can make an appointment at the UAB Medical Blood Donation Center in downtown Birmingham, or go give at the Birmingham Blood Donation Center at 700 Caldwell Trace. The website can point you in the right direction and makes appointments easy.

You also can download the blood donor app at the App Store to make it even easier. (You do all your paperwork ahead of time, and they keep up with your donations and remind you when you can donate again.)

It’s important that you go and give blood as soon as you can, if you can. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, a great many blood drives have been canceled, and there are severe blood shortages throughout the country and right here at home, too.

I went to give the other day, and while it took a little longer than I expected, I just waited my turn and read my book (six feet away from the other people waiting for their turns). The entire procedure was safe and felt that way, too. The people working there took many, many precautions in dealing with us. I never, for one moment, felt uncomfortable or afraid.

So please, if you can give blood, go and give.

Baking Bread

Here’s something you can bake that will be very satisfying (on so many levels) … even if you are not a baker.

It’s No-Knead Bread. It requires very special equipment, few ingredients, no kneading and not much baking experience. Really, time is the only big factor here.

It takes 24 hours to make this bread, but much of that time the dough is unattended.

We got the recipe from The New York Times, they got it from Jim Lahey, owner of Sullivan Street Bakery. It is one of the most popular recipes the Times has ever published, and my husband has made it for years.

It calls for only three ingredients–flour, yeast and salt–and you probably already have them in your pantry.

He bakes our loaves in a cast iron dutch oven, and it comes out with an amazing crust.

Get the recipe here.

Enjoy!

My Favorite (Game-Changing) Hair Tool

My older daughter told me about the Revlon One-Step Hair Dryer and Volumizer Hot Air Brush when I was recovering from shoulder surgery recently. Blowouts at Blo Blow Dry Bar in Homewood were awesome (love that head massage!) but I couldn’t do that every week.

But even with very limited range of motion (happy to say I’m better now!), I was able to use this brush-dryer combo to get smooth and sleek, yet still full, results. It really is an amazing product.

And now that most of us are spending more time at home anyway, this is a good item to have on hand.

While I’m all about supporting local stores, most are not open now so you can order it from Amazon here.

But when all this is over, I encourage you to visit my friends at Blo. They do a really great job and it’s such a treat!

Virtual Dance Party

I miss my friends (and the energy!) of The Bike Room at Ignite Cycle at Pepper Place. Often I was the oldest rider in the room, but that never mattered. We all become equal on those bikes, riding for ourselves and, recently, for each other.

Also, I loved, loved, loved going to class there with my grown kids!

It really is a wonderful, welcoming community. It’s a giving community, too. They share their fantastic setlists on the Ignite Cycle website, and when I’m not in The Bike Room, I use those sometimes as running playlists.

In an effort to reach out and lift up, the Ignite team is hosting virtual dance parties Monday-Friday and on Saturdays, too. Over the last two nights, more than 500 people joined in!

One participant left this message on Ignite’s Instagram: “as I danced alone, all that weird lonely energy that had been building up all day melted away. your INCREDIBLE vibes filled me to the brim with joy and gave me the motivation to keep going. I’m grateful to wake up today and to have something *totally stress-free* to look forward to🖤”

If you want to dance along with the uber-cool Ignite girls, tune into their IG Live for a 45 minute set from @djkallima Monday through Friday at 5:15 p.m. and Saturday at noon. It’s easy. Go to their Instagram at the appropriate time, and click on the profile picture and watch the live video.

It’s free. They say: “Community is too important for us to charge for it at a time it’s hard to find 🖤

The lyrics will be CLEAN … they know some people have “little ears” at home. Go on; dance with your fam!

It’s easy. Just hop on IG Live and get on the digital dance floor. Maybe you FaceTime with some friends, and it really does become a party.

Meanwhile, connect with the Ignite team @ignitecyclebhm on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Find a Happy Place

The beach is my happy place, but now I’m finding joy outside my windows here at home. I saw a red-headed woodpecker yesterday–the first one I’ve seen in a few years– and it made my heart leap.

But I only saw it because I was looking.

Take time to look for joy during these stressful days. You might be surprised by what you see.

I’ll use this blog each day to share things that might make coping easier. Sometimes that might be exercises or recipes or links to things I think you’d want to know. Like this:

The Calm app is sharing some great tools to help us take care of our minds and stay grounded. And these tools are free.


They have created a 
free resource page with meditations, stories, music, talks and more, all hand-picked to support your mental and emotional wellness.

You’ll find soothing meditations, sleep meditations, calming music and (my favorite) sleep stories. There are even tips and techniques for helping calm our kids.

Take a deep breath. Look around you wherever you are right now.

Find some joy. Take care.

Doodle With an Expert

I thought I’d use this blog space to share something new every day that might make sheltering in place a little easier during the coronavirus pandemic. Maybe it’s a book. Maybe it’s a recipe. Maybe it’s a tip. Maybe it’s just something to make you laugh. I hope this helps. It helps me to be able to share with those I love.

If your house is a little (a lot) louder these days with kids home from school and beginning to be bored already, here’s something for you all.

LUNCH DOODLES with Mo Willems!

photo from The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Education Artist-in-Residence at Home

Mo Willems invites YOU into his studio every day (Monday-Friday) for his LUNCH DOODLE. Learners of all ages all over the world can draw, doodle and explore new ways of writing by visiting Mo’s studio virtually once a day for the next few weeks.

Yes, I’m talking about the Mo Willems of the adorable Pigeon series (Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! The Pigeon Wants a Puppy!, Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late!) plus many, many more equally beloved books for very young readers.

So grab some paper and pencils, pens or crayons and join Mo to explore ways of writing and making together. Viewers can see each weekday’s new video at noon CST HERE and find activity sheets to print out and enjoy!

Thanks to Mo’s Facebook page for the featured image.

Fox 6 Books: March

These are the books I took to WBRC Fox 6 in March. All are brand new and all are well worth your reading time.

Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid is a Reese Witherspoon book club pick, and it’s a page-turning, witty, satirical commentary on race and privilege and transactional relationships. Alix (pronounced uh-leeks in the French way, although Alix is not French) Chamberlain, a blogger, speaker and lifestyle guru, hires Emira Tucker, a young black woman, to be a babysitter for her toddler. While at the nearby high-end grocery one evening, Emira is accused of kidnapping 3-year-old Briar. Of course, the encounter with the store’s security guard is filmed by a bystander; of course, that video will eventually go viral. Alix, who considers herself “woke,” resolves to make everything right, but it turns out that the person who filmed the incident is someone from Alix’s past—and that person will connect the two women in ways they didn’t expect. Some readers will find this book funny, others will discover it makes them uncomfortable. Either way, it’s worth reading. 

Yellow Bird:  Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch is a work of literary journalism based on a true story. Lissa Yellow Bird is released from prison in 2009 and returns home to the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota to find it drastically altered by an oil boom. Her tribe is forever changed by its newfound wealth yet struggles with violence and addiction. The non-native oilmen who come to work there are mostly down on their luck, just seeking employment after the recession. Then one of these men, Kristopher “KC” Clarke, goes missing from his reservation worksite. While no one else seems too concerned, Lissa becomes obsessed with finding him. Her search for justice becomes a pursuit of her own redemption for her crimes and offers an unflinching look at generations of trauma. The book is the result of eight years of immersive investigation that included Lissa’s extensive email, Facebook and text messages; photographs and audio recordings; and interviews with more than 200 people.

The Antidote for Everything by Kimmery Martin is the second novel by ER doctor-turned-author, and it is inspired by the real-life experience of a fellow physician. Writing with both a sense of humor and a deep understanding of her settings and subjects, this is a story about the power of friendship (not romance) and the dangers of intolerance and the wrongness of medical discrimination. Georgia Brown and Jonah Tsukada are best friends and co-workers at a Charleston hospital. There is humor and drama in their day-to-day:  attending a fainting passenger on an airplane, an undercover ops-style investigation into the hospital’s practices. But then Jonah is called out for providing care for transgender patients, and the hospital plans to fire him. The two friends come up with a plan to get the hospital to reverse its decision, but that plan spirals out of control, putting careers, friendships and patients’ rights at risk.

Saint X by Alexis Schaitkin is a a debut novel that is attracting a lot of buzz right now. Claire Thomas is 7 years old when her college-age sister, Alison, goes missing on the last night of the family’s vacation at a resort on a Caribbean island called Saint X. Alison is found several days later in a nearby cay, and two local men who work at the resort are arrested. But there is little evidence, so they are soon released and the mystery of what happened to Alison is unresolved. Years later in New York, Claire happens to see Clive Richardson, one of the men accused of murdering her sister, and she sets out to uncover exactly what happened to Alison that terrible night. Her search also becomes an obsession to understand the sister she never really had a chance to get to know.  

I link to Amazon to show you exactly what book I’m talking about, but I love to shop locally at Church Street Coffee and BooksThe Alabama Booksmith, Little Professor Book Center, and I often visit my local library.